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Welcome, Katherine!

Here at MMT, we have had a busy summer full of group and individual sessions, and many camps! We also brought in a new team member, Katherine Dukes!

Katherine grew up in Clarkesville, GA, and attended the University of Georgia where she received her Bachelor’s degree in Music Therapy. She values the intentionality of music experiences to enhance connections and encourage individual growth and expression. Katherine is excited to be back in Georgia as a member of the Metro Music Therapy team and looks forward to working with her clients and their families.

We are so thrilled that Katherine has joined our team! Be sure to say hi if you see her around the office or while she is out in the city providing services!

Welcome, Kiele!

We are so excited to announce that Kiele Kaupe, formerly our music therapy intern, is now here to stay with MMT! Kiele recently passed her board certification exam and is our newest MT-BC on the the team. If you haven’t had a chance to meet Kiele yet, we promise you will want to soon! She is a ray of sunshine and we are all so happy to have her on the the MMT team!

You can read more about Kiele here.

Now Hiring in Atlanta!

Candidates are perfect for this open job if:
You embody our company core values of:
  • Honesty
  • Empathy
  • Warmth
  • Compassion
  • Making Genuine Connections
  • Having FUN!
You are energetic and passionate about Music Therapy.
You thrive in supportive yet autonomous work environments.
You live or want to live in the Metro Atlanta, GA area.
You are looking for PART-TIME work right now, but want to grow to Full-Time by August 2022.
You LOVE working with older adults, and are just as happy working with children & all ages in between!
You can run an MT group in your sleep (ok not really, but it must come naturally to you)!
You can play guitar proficiently.
You can sing any genre of music in a pleasing manner.
You are an MT-BC.
You are Licensed to practice MT in GA.
You can advocate for MT in a clear, concise, and effective way.
You can interface and build professional rapport with administration and support staff in facilities.
You are a cooperative team player and love working with other Music Therapists on a team.
You contribute new, creative and productive ideas to team meetings.
You can see and understand how your work within an organization contributes to the overall growth and success of that organization.
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World Music Therapy Day

On days like today and in times such as this, it can be hard to understand how music really can help and heal.

Today is World Music Therapy Day, and we encourage you to think about how music has positively impacted your life …

How did you learn your alphabet?

What brings a nation together at the start of a sporting event?

What drives home the emotion of the story and can even foreshadow what is coming next in your favorite movie?

What has the power to bring back memories from ones’ wedding day?

What medium is used as an artistic, creative, and emotional outlet when war has raged in our country or in others, and when people feel helpless against forces much larger than themselves?

Music, in and of itself, powerfully effects and drives our emotions, feelings, thoughts, memories, and physical state. When a trained music therapist who has learned when and how to introduce music into the therapeutic setting meets a client who is at the threshold of their desire to seek change within their own life, the results can be astounding.

Music Therapy has an important place in society and should continue to be utilized while our collective mental and emotional health is on the fringe from prolonged effects of the pandemic and heightened international conflict.

Here at Metro Music Therapy, we believe in the efficacy of the work that we do, and we believe in our clients with whom we are working. Our team is proud to be Board-Certified Music Therapists, and we will continue to leverage the transformative power of music to bring healing during life’s most trying seasons.

Stay well, and keep making music!

Calm in Chaos

Now more than ever, we are all feeling the effects of stress in our everyday lives. Not only can stress negatively affect our well-being on a day-to-day basis, but it can also lead to long-term physical and mental health challenges. If you’re experiencing things like brain fog, tiredness, and lack of motivation, you’re not alone. The ongoing experience of the COVID-19 pandemic is a challenge we are all facing together! If you’re looking for ways to cultivate calm and clarity during this tumultuous time, here are some tips that may help.

  1. Introduce Novelty – Have you ever seen a frightening or disheartening news story and wanted to disengage from it, but found it next to impossible to stop watching or reading? This is because our brains naturally crave novelty! When something is new and different, our attention is immediately pulled to it. This mechanism helps protect us by keeping us alert to potential dangers, but it can also lead to increased stress. In regards to COVID, we may find it difficult to disengage from the news or social media. Trying to simply turn off the news or close the tab often proves ineffective, not because we lack willpower, but because it goes against how our brains are wired to behave. One way to help mitigate this effect is to introduce another form of novelty to shift our attention away. Watching a funny video or listening to interesting music can help replace the new, exciting sensory input our brains crave while helping to relieve stress and improve our mood.
  2. Get Oxygen Flowing – Things like gentle movement and deep breathing might seem small, but they can be remarkably helpful when we feel burned out and overwhelmed. Moving our bodies and taking deep breaths both provide fresh oxygen to our brains, which helps us think more clearly, solve problems more easily, and manage our emotions. Try taking a couple of minutes to walk around, gently stretch, or just take a few slow, deep breaths. Some people may find it helpful to set a few reminders over the course of a busy day.
  3. Try a small, Achievable Task – When we’re feeling stressed, burnt out, and overwhelmed, even small tasks may feel insurmountable. One way to help with this can be setting a small, easily achievable task that creates a feeling of productivity and energy when completed. If you’re feeling overwhelmed by a backlog of emails, try answering one that only needs a short, easy response. If you need to clean your kitchen, try just wiping down the countertops. You can even write the task down on paper or in your phone, then check it off when it’s completed. It might feel a bit silly, but it can help break the anxiety cycle and propel the day forward.
  4. Give yourself permission to Feel Your Feelings – While we may use these techniques and many others to reduce or prevent “negative” emotions, it is just as necessary to allow ourselves to feel them fully when the time is right. Try to give yourself permission to express strong emotions rather than repress them – cry, vent to a friend, or sing along to music that matches how you feel. We all deserve the space and time to express our feelings, whatever they may be.

We hope you find these tips helpful! While we can’t completely avoid stress and worry, small steps like these can help us lead healthier and happier lives. Our team wishes you a safe, fun, and joyful 2022!

Meet Clark!

Meet our new intern, Clark Castle!

Clark was born and raised in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, and went to school at William Carey University, studying Music Therapy. Clark’s primary instrument is guitar, but he has also played bass since he was in the high school jazz band. In Clark’s free time, he enjoys playing bass and guitar and making music.

We are excited to watch Clark grow in the coming months during his internship here at MMT!

Bailey’s Bell Choir

It has a nice RING to it, doesn’t it? 😉

We know some of you are already dreaming of summer, but we didn’t want to miss the chance to share this awesome Bell Choir performance of Silent Night! Bailey has loved leading this Bell Choir in North Carolina. We hope you enjoy!

Happy New Year!

We want to take a moment during this busy week back to work and wish you a Happy New Year! We truly hope you had a wonderful holiday season, and feel excited and inspired to begin another year. But … maybe you don’t feel excited or inspired. Maybe you feel anxious, stressed, burned out, or depressed.

If you feel that you are stuck and need help moving forward or moving on from something, our team is here for those very reasons. Please reach out any time to find out if Music Therapy is exactly what you or your loved one has been needing.

If you want to see what we were up to in December, meet our new intern, or watch Bailey’s Bell Choir performance, you can find all of that in our latest Newsletter here.

 

Helpful or Harmful?

When our team presents to a room of healthcare professionals, one of our biggest points that we drive home is the simple fact that, if we believe music holds the power to help us, then we must acknowledge that it also holds the power to harm us, if and when it is used incorrectly.

Think about it for a minute – if music can positively influence our heart rate, breathing patterns, feelings, and emotions, then music can also negatively influence our heart rate, breathing patterns, feelings and emotions!

Even though introducing music as a treatment option in the healthcare setting is much less invasive or costly than introducing a drug/medicine, scalpel, or some sort of painful physical exertion, if any element of the music is introduced in an inappropriate way for the moment or environment, then it can cause stress, anxiety, aggravation, and can open the floodgates of emotions. Opening the floodgates can be a great thing – but it is important to do so in a safe, therapeutic setting, which is what Music Therapists do best.

How can music be inappropriate to the moment or environment? A few simple answers include: timing, tempo, volume, instrument selection, genre of music, song selection, history of song, pitch and key of song, placement of sound source, and the overall timbre of the music being played. If some of these elements don’t sound simple, but instead very complicated to you, don’t worry! Music therapists are equal parts trained musician and trained therapist — because the MUSIC and the THERAPY are equally important!

We often hear statements like, “Oh we have music therapy in our facility — we have a harpist who plays in the foyer!” And while we truly love that patients have access to music that they may enjoy, we always want to gently remind our audience that music therapy is a clinical treatment option which is provided by a trained and board-certified Music Therapist (“MT-BC”). So while the harpist may be the best at their craft, if they are not an MT-BC, then the music they are providing is not music therapy. And what if a patient is being subjected to music that they don’t like? What if harp music causes agitation, anxiety, or even triggers an emotion or memory that a patient who is isolated in their room needs assistance processing? When not carefully curated and presented, simply stated, music can be harmful.

If you have questions about how to safely incorporate music into your healthcare setting, we can help! Please consult and hire a Music Therapist; and while we would love for it to be us, we understand if you go elsewhere — just make sure they are a Board-Certified Music Therapist who is credentialed by the Certification Board for Music Therapists — and in states like Georgia, be sure they also have their state license to practice!

All MT-BCs should have the below badge readily available to show to you, and should also have a 5-digit certification number. You can also look up certification status of any music therapist here.

Veterans Day 2021

Here at Metro Music Therapy, we truly believe that our Veterans should be honored every day!

We are proud to tell you more about our newest partnership with Emory Healthcare.

Emory Healthcare Veterans Program

It has been our honor to recently come alongside the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program (EHVP) to provide music therapy services to the veterans and service members in their care. EHVP is a part of the Wounded Warrior Project’s Warrior Care Network, a nationwide program which recognizes the stress of military service and the challenges of returning to civilian life. Post-9/11 veterans and service members struggling with invisible wounds such as PTSD, TBI, MST, Anxiety or Depression, may benefit from this free and confidential Intensive Outpatient Program.

During our sessions at the Emory Healthcare Veterans Program, veterans collaborate with each other to relax, express themselves, share coping skills, and build confidence and self-esteem. Each veteran brings a unique perspective and experience, and it is my honor to facilitate these groups.
– Hayley Oliver, LPMT, MT-BC

We hope you enjoy the special edition of the MMT Newsletter, wherein we highlight our work specific to Veterans. You can read the entire newsletter here.

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