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So far Mallory Even has created 29 blog entries.

Happy New Year!

HAPPY 2020!

We love to start our year off with reflection of the past while visioning for the future. Among many other discussions, at our first staff meeting of 2020, we talked about what makes Metro Music Therapy different than any other private practice out there. Here is what we bring to the table:

+ We’re passionate about serving
+ We empower & encourage those who may be unseen to society
+ OUR WORK IS NOT ABOUT US!
+ We believe everyone has worth!
+ We believe in human connection
+ We love our community
+ We exist to help others
+ We’re creating jobs!
+ We’re creating internship/teaching opportunities!
+ We’re passing on experience & wisdom to our field
+ We’re a connected team
+ We workshop issues & celebrate victories
+ Supportive environment for staff & clients
+ We have an encourage great communication
+ We’re authentic
+ Genuine
+ Trustworthy
+ We say Yes!
+ We’re brave & bold
+ AWESOME at our craft
+ 50+ years of experience among our entire team!
+ We like each other and HAVE FUN!

We’d love to work with you in 2020! ?
(Awesome team members, Kevin and Paola, missing from photos)

2020-01-22T18:46:56+00:00January 13th, 2020|Music Therapy|

Veteran Retreat

In just a few short weeks, in partnership with Music Therapy of the Rockies and Wellspring International, Metro Music Therapy will be co-hosting a Songwriting Retreat for Veterans with PTSD right here in Atlanta. This retreat will be the first of its kind in the Atlanta area, and we are honored to bring this life-changing experience to our local Veterans!

Throughout the retreat weekend, 12 Veterans will partake in group music therapy sessions, group guitar lessons, and will work with a professional songwriter to share their stories and turn them into original song. The weekend concludes with a warm, intimate concert where each Veteran’s song will be performed and heard by their family, friends, and peer Veterans who have experienced the weekend with them.

If you believe in the power of music like we do, and want this retreat to be the start of a new journey for a Veteran diagnosed with PTSD, here are 3 ways you can help today:

  1. REFER A VETERAN: If you know of a Veteran with PTSD in the Atlanta area, and you think this retreat could be just what they need, please have them fill out the Request for Retreat Registration form here. If you are the Veteran with PTSD who could benefit from this experience, please follow the link above to request retreat registration.
  2. REFER A MUSIC THERAPIST: One of the most unique aspects of this Veteran Retreat, which differentiates the event from most other Veteran songwriting experiences, is that the entire retreat is planned and led by a Board-Certified Music Therapist (MT-BC) who is passionate about sharing his knowledge and experience with other MTs. Because of this, MT-BCs can attend a continuing education training the 2 days prior to the retreat and are also involved in the retreat for the entire weekend to complete their training and education. There are not many opportunities out there like this, and having been through the training and experience myself, I can attest that the Veterans lives are not the only ones changed through this weekend. If you are an MT-BC or know of one who is interested in signing up for this CMTE course, please request the Workshop Registration here.
  3. MAKE A DONATION: This retreat is completely FREE for each Veteran who attends! Retreat attendance includes meals, all group and individual sessions, and a guitar which each Veteran keeps. To make this possible, we need donations of all sizes. You can make a tax-deductible donation here.
photo credit: Marcus Serrano

This Veteran Retreat will be held from November 15-17, 2019, in Alpharetta, GA. For more details about the retreat, or for questions about any of the above, please reach out any time: mallory@metromusictherapyga.com

With love,

2019-10-22T16:53:09+00:00September 11th, 2019|Mental Health, MT in Healthcare, Veterans, Wellness|

A Star is Born: A Two-Note Love Story

*SPOILER ALERT: If you haven’t seen the film yet, but plan to and don’t want to know the end, then DO NOT READ. But, be sure to come back and read after you have seen it! 

Ok, you’ve been fully warned.

Upon seeing the first preview for this film in the spring, I was all in. The music and acting were promising to be of a caliber that Hollywood had not seen in awhile. I was able to attend an early screening of A Star is Born and was completely ready to dive into this musical and emotional love story.

Or so I thought.

Guys – this movie wrecked me! And I brought my unsuspecting friend straight down into the depths of this emotional pit with me right there in the theater. When the credits rolled, we just sat there in silence, wiping our tears, unwilling and unable to move. Since then, we have talked over and over about the story, the music, the acting, and all of the beautiful nuances that left us and most other viewers completely bereft yet fulfilled all at the same time.

When I watch or experience something for the first time, I am typically watching with a heightened level of anticipation because of the fear of the unknown. After I know that I know what is going to happen, I want to watch again through a new set of eyes and ears; a more relaxed, tuned-in set of eyes and ears that are able to experience things at a deeper level because the anxiety of the unknown has now faded. Yes, I realize this is a hard way to experience real-life events, seeing as they can never fully be replicated, so I have to work very hard to “be in the moment” in these situations. But I digress.

The Greatest Showman? Forget it. Once I knew all turned out okay in the end, I was all-in. I lost count after seeing it in the theater 7 times. But A Star is Born has a different ending than that of The Greatest Showman. The overall feel is heavier; more raw, and much, much darker; and the ending is not neatly packaged with a bow on top. So seeing this movie in the theater again was going to leave me wrecked – again – but since it was nearly impossible to place the story and the music out of my mind and far from my thoughts, I ended up back in the theater. Again.

If you’re reading, you’ve seen the film (or you are purposefully ruining the film for yourself!). The movie was filled with intense relationships, a small look at life on the road for a touring musician, incredible original music, the reality and pain associated with alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and depression, and of course, the love story of Jack (Bradley Cooper) and Ally (Lady Gaga). Ally gets unconventionally courted by Jack as she and a friend are flown on a private jet to attend one of Jack’s concerts. That night following the concert, Jack slips into unconsciousness in a hotel room due to the excessive amount of substances used before, during, and after the show. He wakes in the middle of the night and begins to wake Ally; as this scene plays out, two single notes with no other accompaniment are played in the background as the rest of the world appears it has slipped away. A-A-B-B and then repeats again, A-A-B-B. So simple, and with so little fanfare that I did not pay much attention to this motif the first time I saw the film.

Two-Note Motif (this is a raw recording taken from a piano app – not nearly as beautiful without the sustain pedal!)

But this time it struck me as alluring, and somewhat familiar. I couldn’t put my finger on why. I continued to notice the motif throughout the movie this time, all during significant moments in the story; it was again played when Jack proposed to Ally in the home of their friend in Memphis. And once again, the entire scene melted away as Jack and Ally shared the intimate moment of a marriage proposal with the simple melodic accompaniment joining them in the background.

There are three more times that this motif is played in the film. The first of these three times is when Jack plays the love song he wrote for Ally after he gets home from his long-term inpatient rehabilitation stay. This two-note motif gets embedded into the beginning of the song that he is introducing to her, which we later find to be the foundation and groundwork of the song, “I’ll Never Love Again.”

The fourth time this motif is played, it is by Ally as she is slumped over the piano in the home that she and Jack shared. She begins playing this motif, but this time with a minor key accompaniment. This is the morning after Jack completed suicide; the minor undertones giving us a tiny glimpse into the enormity of the utter despair and pain she must be feeling.

The last time the motif is played is during the last song of the film, when Ally takes the stage at a memorial service for Jack, and performs the song that they shared together, “I’ll Never Love Again.” Besides hearing the sobbing in the theater, you can hear the A-A-B-B  A-A-B-B in the melody of the beginning of the song, and the motif continues to be woven throughout.

I left the theater after the second time viewing the film and realized that the beauty in this two-note motif could be, and probably is, very easily missed by audiences, especially during the first (and possibly only?) viewing. After all, this motif is not at all conspicuous or ornate. It probably sounds silly – there is an entire album of incredibly rich, textured music that has been the byproduct of this film (or may the film was the byproduct of the music?), and here I am focusing in on two notes – but they haunted me throughout the film and continued to even after leaving the theater.

The more I thought about these two notes, the more the motif took shape and began to apply meaning to itself right in front of me. Jack was a tortured soul; one who was complicated, with an injured past, who hurt deeply but loved on an even deeper level. Everything about him was a far cry from simple. But his love for Ally was the one facet of his life that he was able to make sense of. Yes, he hurt her – and badly, at times – but it was very apparent that, from the moment he saw her for who she truly was, his love for her was pure, and some may argue that this love was the one part of his life that remained un-tortured.

This two-note motif was Jack’s love song for Ally, told exclusively through Jack’s eyes — until the end, when this motif blossoms into Ally’s love song for Jack. It starts simple; no accompaniment and no lyrics, but was present during the most significant times of their relationship. And when Jack was gone and Ally didn’t have words, she sat at the piano and played her sadness, grief, and deep love that she felt for Jack through this motif with rich emotion and gravity. And then at the end of the film when Ally takes the stage – oh how the tears are streaming now – she echoes the love that Jack showed to her, that he curated for her by writing this song, and she performs the song in its’ entirety. This is Ally’s brave and heartfelt attempt to do their love story some semblance of justice while her heart is shattered in a million pieces on the floor.

In the aftermath of Jack’s death, his brother, Bobby, reminds Ally of Jack’s theory on music… “Jack talked about how music is essentially 12 notes between any octave. Twelve notes, and the octave repeats. It’s the same story, told over and over, forever. All any artist can offer the world is how they see those 12 notes. He loved how you see them.”

Everyone has a story; and this musician believes that if you have a story, you have a song.
How would yours sound?
Who would be your co-writer?
What might you be able to say through 12 notes that you couldn’t say with words?

Where words fail, music speaks.” – Hans Christian Andersen

 

 

2018-11-02T13:56:49+00:00November 2nd, 2018|Bereavement, Blog, Grief & Loss, Mental Health|

Walk to Remember: Life After Perinatal Loss

This Sunday, in recognition of October as National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month, Northside Hospital hosted their annual Atlanta Walk to Remember. Our team had the privilege of attending this event alongside a number of parents, families, friends, and other healthcare professionals, all there to remember the precious and much-too-short lives of the babies they have lost. Suffice to say, we were honored to be entrusted with providing the musical backdrop for such an important day! Kevin Middlebrooks played piano while families arrived, found their seats before the presentation, and enjoyed refreshing popsicles in the warm autumn afternoon. Meanwhile, Bianca Ford, Maria Nichta, and Camila Casaw led the younger guests through a menagerie of fun and unusual sounds at the “Instrument Petting Zoo.” Later during the presentation, our whole crew came together – led by Maria and Bianca – to sing a few songs in honor of life after loss.

The theme of this year’s Walk was “Tribe”, and the beautiful example of the elephant was given: Elephants are among the most intelligent creatures on earth. That statement does not only refer to their ability to think practically, but also to their emotional intelligence. When a mother elephant loses her baby, she will lay by its side and grieve while the rest of the herd gathers around her, laying their trunks gently on her back for support until she is ready to move. This kind of empathy embodies the spirit of Northside’s “Tribe” in the face of the silent grief that is Perinatal Loss. As Music Therapists, we have a unique and powerful medium with which we can come beside our clients, their families, and one another in the midst of pain. When words fail, we have a tool to help us demonstrate empathy for our own “Tribe” until they are ready to move, ready to speak, or ready to sing again.

There is no time-table for grief. Eventually, our hope is that we can gather together and sing, like we did on Sunday: I think I can make it now, the pain is gone. All of the bad feelings have disappeared. Here is the rainbow I’ve been praying for. It’s gonna be a bright, bright, sun-shiny day. But until then, may we lie still with our Tribe in their pain – until they are ready to move.

{If you would like to learn more about the Northside Hospital H.E.A.R.T.strings Perinatal Bereavement and Palliative Care Department, please visit their website.}

Written by Kevin Middlebrooks, LPMT, MT-BC

 

 

 

 

 

Hiring FULL-Time MT-BC!

OPEN: FULL-TIME MUSIC THERAPY POSITIONwork with us

Company Information:
Metro Music Therapy, LLC | Serving Atlanta, GA
www.metromusictherapyga.com

Start Date: IMMEDIATE

Hours: Full-time, 40 hours per week

Position Description: MMT team member will provide individual and group music therapy services and community support services to clients of all ages located throughout the Metro Atlanta area

Populations Served in this Position: Hospice patients, bereaved children and families, refugees, pediatric clients (in-home), at-risk youth in residential facilities, veterans with PTSD and TBI, memory care patients in ALF/NH facilities, Corporate Wellness sessions

Benefits of working at Metro Music Therapy:

  • We are an energetic, knowledgeable, dynamic, diverse, and FUN team of Music Therapists and Recreation Therapists!
  • FREE Continuing Education through our very own MMT Academy!
  • Self-care and Wellness opportunities built into every team meeting
  • Gain professional experience working with a wide variety of populations
  • Opportunity to gain professional autonomy
  • MMT is well-known for creating new, innovative MT programs, that are built specifically to meet the needs of our clients
  • Love student/intern supervision? We are a competitive site for University-Affiliated Internships and get the cream of the crop here!
  • Flexible Schedule
  • Paid travel time and Mileage Reimbursement
  • MMT pays State Association dues for all MTs on staff (Music Therapy Association of Georgia)
  • Competitive Pay and Benefits

Job Requirements:

  • Must be an MT-BC and Licensed to practice MT in Georgia (or have an active application)
  • Must be willing to work some nights and weekends at times
  • Willingness to travel (paid travel time & some mileage reimbursement)
  • Ability to work cooperatively with an Interdisciplinary Treatment Team
  • Hospice experience preferred

Salary: Hourly pay with possibility of moving to salary; Commensurate with experience


Application for Employment – Written
Application for Employment – PDF

**Applications will be accepted until this Friday, May 12th, at 5:00pm!**

Please complete the above application, and send with resume to:
Mallory Even, LPMT, MT-BC
Owner & Director, Metro Music Therapy
Mallory@metromusictherapyga.com

2017-05-09T14:37:37+00:00April 24th, 2017|For the Music Therapist|

Mindful Moments

womens centerThe path leading to the Women’s Center Labor and Delivery unit may not always lead to the ending that parents have in mind.

While experiencing some of their deepest sorrow, families at Northside Hospital are surrounded by love and support from the H.E.A.R.T.strings Perinatal Bereavement and Palliative Care team.

Perinatal Team and Mallory

Our team was thrilled to partner with this amazing department to create a relaxation CD for families who have suffered an unimaginable loss.

The MMT team poured months of work into this labor of love, and this morning, Mallory was thrilled to hand-deliver 100 “Mindful Moments” relaxation CDs to the hospital!

These CDs will be given to families upon discharge from the hospital in order to bring comfort and to create a time for healing and relaxation to take place whenever needed.

A huge thanks to our Assistant Director, Sam Shanine, for composing, recording, and producing the musical tracks for this album, to the MMT team and the H.E.A.R.T.strings team for writing the scripts, and to Selena Fettig of Beanpress Cards for the cover and insert layout and artwork.

Days like these remind us to continue to be grateful to have meaningful connections with others – whether it’s with our colleagues in the caring professions or with families that we may never meet, but who have already touched our lives.

 

front cover

order of CD

cd label

MM Atlanta

 

 

 

Our New Music Therapy Intern!

Please help us welcome Bianca “Bee Bee” Ford, our new Music Therapy Intern!

20161027_094454-1

Bianca Ford is originally from Birmingham, Alabama, and earned her bachelor’s degree in Music at the University of Alabama- Birmingham. After graduating from UAB, she moved to Tuscaloosa to complete her certification in Music Therapy at the University of Alabama. She has had the opportunity to work with clients in local schools, adult rehabilitation and nursing facilities.

She is currently and intern at Metro Music Therapy in Atlanta, GA. Her principal instrument is voice . While she is also proficient in piano and guitar, she enjoys songwriting also. When she is not working with clients, she enjoys cooking and reading. Bianca is thrilled to be on the Metro Music Therapy team.

2017-01-05T17:22:03+00:00January 5th, 2017|Uncategorized|

Children’s Bereavement Services

Do you know of a child who is currently experiencing grief? We may not think of it too often, but where there are grieving adults, there are sure to be grieving children.girl-with-candle
The holidays can be a very difficult time for a young one to experience the sorrows that can accompany death or divorce.
 
You may know a child who is experiencing anticipatory grief; a grief reaction that occurs before an impending loss. If a child knows that their sibling, parent, grandparent, or friend will soon die, they are likely already grieving and may need additional support.
 
Our Songs of Hope Children’s Bereavement Music Therapy Services may be just what they need. All services are absolutely free due to grant-funding from Wellspring International.
Please share this post to help us reach more hurting families in the metro Atlanta area.

 

2016-12-13T21:48:46+00:00December 13th, 2016|Grief & Loss, Holidays, Music Therapy|

Adaptive Lessons coming to Vinings!

We are so thrilled to announce that, beginning in January 2017, we will be offering Adaptive Lessons at The Music Studio at Vinings!painted-piggies-on-piano

How do you know if Adaptive Lessons are right for your child? Here is our handy dandy checklist that you can use to find out:

  • Does your child love music?
  • Are they motivated by music?
  • Has your child struggled in music lessons before?
  • Does your child have learning differences?
  • Do you think your child would struggle with standard teaching styles?
  • Does your child have a formal diagnosis or IEP?

If you answered yes to 2 or more of the above questions, your child may thrive in Adaptive Music Lessons with our trained and qualified staff! All of our team members have a background in music therapy, which means that instead of a one-size-fits-all approach, we adapt our teaching style to best fit your child’s needs.

We still have a few openings for Saturday mornings, so call or email today to schedule!
404.579.8070
mallory@metromusictherapyga.com

Download our flyer here: adaptive-lessons-flyer

2016-12-12T16:43:38+00:00December 12th, 2016|Adaptive Lessons|
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