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Who Even Keeps Resolutions, Anyway? S.M.A.R.T. Goals Are Better

It’s hard to believe that we’re already mid-way through February of 2019!
New Year’s Eve doesn’t seem so long ago. The promise of a new year, a fresh start, exciting possibilities… it’s more than enough to get the old motivational engine revved and roaring! Plans form, goals are etched in stone, and we feel certain that this year – really, though, this year! – we’ll stick to that New Year’s Resolution. We will not waver!

Alright so, show of hands:
Now that the excitement of the new year has begun to wane, how many of us are actually keeping up with those resolutions?

If your hand is raised, way to go! Keep it up!
[Bonus points if you literally raised your hand just now.]
If not, don’t beat yourself up. You’re in good company!

This blog is certainly not intended to make anyone feel bad about themselves.
If it were, what kind of a weird Music Therapy practice would we be?
This blog is rather an attempt to offer a – potentially – more effective method for those of you, like myself, who have a hard time maintaining those lofty resolutions.
I mean, who even keeps resolutions anyway?
[Ahem… Y’all just keep doing you, hand-raisers. You’re awesome.]
Instead, try S.M.A.R.T. Goals!

Yes, S.M.A.R.T. Goals – the very same type of goals that we like to set with our amazing Clients!
You may have heard this acronym before, but in case you haven’t, let’s review what it means, and look over some examples.

S – Specific
S.M.A.R.T. goals are specific. They can be explained in detail.
“I will exercise more.” Sounds a bit vague, huh?
How about… “I will go running for at least 30 minutes, two times a week.”
That’s getting specific!
“Client will improve articulation.” In what way?
How about… “Client will practice bilabial consonant sounds five times per session.”
Now we’re talking.

M – Measurable
S.M.A.R.T. goals are measurable. We can keep track of them.
“I will drink more water.” How much?
How about… “I will drink five 18oz bottles of water each day.”
Sounds good!
“Client will improve short-term memory.” How can that be measured?
How about… “Client will recall at least 4 of 6 notes in a melodic sequence.”
That’ll work!

A – Attainable
S.M.A.R.T. goals are attainable. They are realistic and within reach, given the effort.
“I will be a famous actor on Broadway.” Maybe someday! What steps can you take now?
How about… “I will audition for the local production of The Little Mermaid next month.”
Totally doable.
“Client will walk independently, without assistance.” Admirable goal! But let’s take it one step at a time – literally.
How about… “Client will independently take 8 steps using a cane, by March 31, 2019.”
Challenging, but within reach.

R – Relevant
S.M.A.R.T. goals are relevant.
They have something to do with the area on which you’re focusing.
“I want to read more, so I will go swimming twice a week for three months.” Wait, what?
How about… “I want to read more, so I will join the ‘book of the month’ club.”
That’s more like it.
“Client wants to improve her fine motor skills. Client will write a song to express and cope with feelings of anxiety.” Not quite what we’re looking for right now.
How about… “Client wants to improve her fine motor skills. Client will practice isolating fingers by playing a 5-finger C Scale on the piano for 5 minutes each day.”
There we go!

T – Time-Bound
S.M.A.R.T. goals are time-bound. They indicate by when the goal is intended to be met.
“I will learn to speak Spanish.” Okay, but what’s your time-table?
How about… “I will learn 10 new Spanish phrases before my niece’s quinceañera next Saturday.” Having a schedule helps!
“Client will create a playlist of preferred music to ease anxiety.” When will they need it?
How about… “Client will create a playlist of 30 preferred songs [~90 minutes] to ease anxiety during his chemotherapy treatment this Friday.”
Friday it is!

So when it comes to New Year’s Resolutions, are your goals Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-Bound?
If so, you’re thinking S.M.A.R.T.!
Lofty, vague resolutions can be intimidating and disappointing when we don’t live up to them. But S.M.A.R.T. goals can help us stay motivated and on track, by focusing on the specific objective, measuring progress, and establishing a schedule for completion.
Who keeps resolutions anyway? S.M.A.R.T. goals are better.

– Written by Kevin Middlebrooks, LPMT, MT-BC, NMT

Tempo Time Warp: Why Does Music Sound Slower with Exercise?

(a) Heart pounding, (b) out of breath, (c) muscles tired, (d) altered perception of time. One of these experiences is NOT what I would typically associate with exercise… until recently, that is. Any guesses which?

I’d just finished an evening run, and was driving back home from the trail with some of my favorite music playing. But whooooooaaaa, nelly, did it sound slow!

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Like, nigh unbearably slow. I’m talking goofily exaggerated slow-motion movie scene slow. Which was odd, because I was pretty certain the song in question was usually at a solid “andante” tempo. Suddenly it sounded like it was being sung by Treebeard the Ent, or Flash the DMV Sloth from Zootopia.

Full disclosure – I’m still pretty new to this whole “physical activity” thing.
So you may have noticed this strange phenomenon long ago. But this was a novel experience for me.
Why did some songs sound slower after exercising?
My only thought: “This can’t be the music. It must be my brain.”

Turns out, it probably was! A few google searches later, and I’m reading research articles about music, the brain, and exercise.
For us Music Therapists, the neurological effects of music on the brain are familiar territory – though still always exciting to learn more about!
But adding exercise into the mix? Apparently things get weird.

Here are some potential reasons for this bizarre Tempo Time Warp:

1. There is a tight link between motor activity and temporal processing.
A 2012 study (Hagura, Et al.) examined why professional ball players often experience the ball “slowing down” before hitting it. The findings – as well as other existing literature – indicate a tight link between action preparation and the areas of the brain devoted to coding the passage of time. These same areas of the brain are responsible for anticipating the amount of time an upcoming motion will take. Thus, the motor system plans accordingly. For this very reason, the Academy of Neurologic Music Therapy places an emphasis on tempo and rhythm in facilitating movement interventions, such that the brain is given a “start” and “end” point between each beat of a song to provide an efficient neural map to aid motor planning!

If our brain’s processing of time (e.g. tempo of music) can inform and invigorate our movements, it makes sense that – maybe – it can work in reverse too. Vigorous movement (e.g. exercise) could, perhaps, inform or even alter our perception of time in music.

2. The Musical “Sweet Spot”
According to an interview between Business Insider and one Dr. Costas Karageorghis – author of “Applying Music in Exercise and Sport” – “It seems that as exercise intensity increases, the human organism prefers a higher tempo […] However, there is a ceiling effect in terms of music tempo preference at around ~140 bpm and any increase in tempo beyond this does not result in correspondingly enhanced aesthetic responses or greater subjective motivation.”

Because people tend to prefer faster, more stimulating music when exercising at a high intensity, the need for more stimulation “may translate to a perception that the music tempo is decreasing.”

Essentially, this means that congruence between activity level and musical elements (especially tempo) matters. It would feel strange to watch a car chase in an action movie while listening to Chopin’s Raindrop Prelude, or to pair a lullaby with a football highlights reel. As Music Therapists, we call this the “Iso Principle” – matching the music to the current physical or emotional state of the client before gradually shifting. And apparently, if the music we listen to while exercising is incongruous with our activity level – outside of our tempo “sweet spot,” that is – it may even sound slower than normal!

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Furthermore, if our rate of movement continues to increase as we work harder in exercise (i.e. running at a faster pace), and yet the music stays at a steady tempo, it can feel as though the tempo is decreasing.



3. Think fast!
It turns out, our brains may even process things at a faster rate when we exercise, so the speed of external stimuli such as music feels as though it is decreasing. Dr. Karageorghis explains, “During low-to-moderate intensity exercise, the brain is oxygenated and so processing speeds can be increased as a consequence, especially in older adults.”

However, the reverse is true at higher intensities of exercise, such that processing of external stimuli such as music is actually limited.

4. “Everything hurts and I’m dying.”
The perception of time is also subjective, changing based on our experiences and what we’re doing. We know this as we get older, because my, how the years fly. When we’re ten years old, a full year is a significant chunk of our life, and thus time feels as though it moves more slowly than when we’re older. You’ve certainly heard the phrase “time flies when you’re having fun!” The opposite seems to hold true as well, doesn’t it? When you’re longing intensely for something, time can really slow down.

During intense exercise, then, the pain of physical exertion may cause a longing for relief, and thus a “slowing down” of time.

So it sounds like a lot of factors play into the Tempo Time Warp!
In any case, this is just another reminder of how intricate and complex – and just downright fascinating! – our brains’ responses to music in conjunction with other activities of life can be.

– Kevin Middlebrooks, LPMT, MT-BC, NMT

Read more about this topic from Lindsay Dodgson at Business Insider here: https://www.businessinsider.com/why-music-appears-to-slow-down-when-you-exercise-2017-9?r=UK&IR=T

Other Sources:
Hagura, N., Kanai, R., Orgs, G., & Haggard, P. (2012). Ready steady slow: Action preparation slows the subjective passage of time. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences,279(1746). doi:https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2012.1339

The Academy of Neurologic Music Therapy: https://nmtacademy.co/

MMT Spotlight: Maria Nichta

This week, our spotlight is on Maria Nichta! Maria is one of our wonderful Music Therapists who provides Hospice and Bereavement services through the Songs of Hope program, teaches music lessons (adapted and otherwise), and works with adults and older adults at a day program. She also works with veterans at the VA and through the Wounded Warrior Project as both a Music Therapist and a Community Support Specialist. Why don’t you tell us a little more about you, Maria?


Where did you grow up / go to school?
I was born and raised in Cleveland, OH (the East Side!). I’m a Midwestern girl at heart. I went to Beaumont School for high school, and was deeply shaped by a few of my teachers there. I love Cleveland and the people there, but those winters can be brutal! I always encourage people to visit if they’ve never been. In 2012, I moved to Charlotte, NC for college, where I attended Queens University of Charlotte. I’ve really grown to love the south. Sometimes I sound a little confused when I talk, though – I’ll say “pop” (NOT “soda”) and “y’all” in the same breath.

How did you decide to pursue Music Therapy?
I’ve always loved music, and my mom says I was singing before I could talk. I played the piano and oboe in elementary school, and I started to teach myself guitar in high school. I always knew I wanted to use my passion for music in some way, while also being able to help others. In the span of a few months, both my private voice teacher and my high school choir teacher told me about Music Therapy. So I started researching what it took to become a Music Therapist, and after that, I was determined! It so perfectly combined my passions. It was definitely challenging at times, but I’m grateful to be doing such meaningful work.

Can you tell us a few of your favorite Music Therapy stories? One funny, one touching?
One of the funniest Music Therapy memories I have took place at one of my practicum sites in college. It was right around Halloween, so I planned a dancing activity for my session with kids. Since it was Halloween, I obviously decided to do “Thriller” by Michael Jackson. I was rushing to get to the session and downloaded the song to my phone right before I left – I had no service at the school, so everything had to be downloaded beforehand since I couldn’t access the internet. Everyone was so excited to hear “Thriller” when we started, but a little over a minute into the song, I realized I downloaded a version that was ONLY the background music. Once I realized this, I started singing to distract from my mistake. I kept leading as if nothing was wrong since we were in the middle of the activity, but I was so thrown off that I forgot half of the words to the song! I laugh every time I hear “Thriller” now.

I feel lucky to have so many touching Music Therapy moments, but one of the most touching memories I have was during my internship. I provided music therapy for a patient for just over 5 months, almost during my whole internship. There wasn’t really one specific session with this patient that stood out, but just my experience with him as a whole. He was unable to speak, due to having a trach in his throat. Even though he was unable to speak, we developed a strong rapport. He passed away just a week before my internship ended, and I think that music therapy brought him so much in his last few months of life.

What song is stuck in your head right now?
“Rainbow” by Kacey Musgraves. She just released her new album Golden Hour at the end of March and I’ve been listening to it non-stop! I’m not even a huge country music fan, but this album is turning me back into one.

If you were an animal, what would you be and why?
I’d have to say a Golden Retriever. I rejected this at first when friends and family said this about me because I felt like it was cliche, but I’ve come to happily accept it. I’m a very loyal, loving, and happy person – if I had a tail, I think it would always be wagging. I’m energetic and I really love to be around people. I’m a very animated person and am easily excited about virtually anything and everything. But, like Dug from Up, I sometimes get distracted and sidetracked (“Squirrel!!!”) when my brain jumps from one thing to the next quickly. I talk a lot and can be pretty persistent (like a dog saying, “Pet me! Pet me! Pet me!”), but at the end of the day it’s because I just love people so much! And I want them to know that.

If you could give a stranger an encouraging word, what would it be?
I would say, “You are enough. Exactly as you are.” This is something that I have to remind myself, time and time again. Yes, you should challenge yourself and strive to keep improving. But cut yourself some slack! You’re human. You’re going to make mistakes, you’re going to be late sometimes, and you’re going to forget that thing that you swore you wouldn’t forget! You might not feel like you’re good enough, or smart enough, or strong enough, or whatever else. But you are enough. Yes you, human who is currently reading this. You are enough. Go look yourself in the mirror and tell yourself that! And imagine that I’m giving you a big hug (or a friendly pat on the back, whatever you need)!

Maria, thanks for all that you do!
You are a bright spot to our team, and we’re so thankful to have you around!

2018-04-30T03:38:53+00:00April 30th, 2018|Music Therapy, Uncategorized|

MMT Spotlight: Garrett Vaughn

Did you know that Metro Music Therapy’s amazing staff includes more than just Music Therapists? Garrett Vaughn is our resident Recreational Therapist – and super Clemson fan – who serves as a Community Support Specialist with veterans through the Wounded Warrior Project. This week’s spotlight is on you, Garrett! Can you tell everyone a little about yourself?


Where did you grow up / go to school?
I grew up in a very small town in upstate South Carolina called Starr. (Population: 186 according to a quick google search) I attended Crescent High School there before heading down to Charleston, SC. I spent a semester at College of Charleston before realizing that home was the place for me. I transferred back to the upstate to finish my degree at Clemson University.

How did you decide to pursue Recreational Therapy?
I decided to pursue Recreational Therapy after my transfer to Clemson. I had originally planned on following the physical therapy path but upon arriving at Clemson found the RT major. I started the course work and really fell in love with Recreational Therapy. I began to work regularly at camps and different events for kids and adults with disabilities on campus. Then just before graduation, I completed an internship on a Traumatic Brain Injury unit at Wake Forest Baptist Hospital in Winston-Salem, NC. It was there that I felt like I found my true calling, which was to work to help those with TBI/ABI. (Traumatic Brain Injury/Acquired Brain Injury)

So, what exactly is a “Community Support Specialist (CSS)?”
What sorts of things do you do with your clients?
As a CSS, I serve through the Wounded Warrior Project to help veterans with traumatic brain injuries to reintegrate into their communities. My process when being assigned to a new warrior would be to first visit in home a few times to gain a rapport with the family and the warrior. In theses visits I would learn about the warrior’s likes and dislikes, as well as what things that he/she enjoyed doing prior to his/her injury. Once I find these things out and the family is comfortable enough with me to allow me to take their warrior out of the house, we go out into the community and do things to stimulate the warriors brain, and just generally show them a good time. An example of this would be things like going to the movies, going on hikes, shooting guns, going fishing, etc. Anything that we can do to allow the warrior to participate in things that they enjoyed doing prior to their injury.

If you had a superpower, what would it be?
If I had a superpower, it would definitely be teleportation! Being able to jump from place to place instead of having to drive or to fly would help to make me extra productive! Plus, no more paying for travel sounds pretty great!

Favorite Sport? Book? Movie?
My favorite sport has always been baseball! (Braves fan since birth) My favorite book is “Fall of Giants”, by Ken Follett. Finally, my favorite movie is Good Will Hunting!

What is your life motto / slogan / mantra?
I don’t necessarily have a motto/mantra but I once saw a saying that has always stuck with me and really influences the way I try to live my life. It’s “Thousands of candles can be lit from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases from being shared.” I love this, because in my life, I really try to focus on promoting as much happiness as I can. Life is hard enough as it is sometimes, so why not try to share a little light with those who come across your path?

Thanks for all the incredible work you do with our Warriors, Garrett!
We’re so glad to have you as part of the MMT family!

2018-03-20T19:33:32+00:00March 20th, 2018|Blog, Uncategorized|

Our New Music Therapy Intern!

Please help us welcome Bianca “Bee Bee” Ford, our new Music Therapy Intern!

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Bianca Ford is originally from Birmingham, Alabama, and earned her bachelor’s degree in Music at the University of Alabama- Birmingham. After graduating from UAB, she moved to Tuscaloosa to complete her certification in Music Therapy at the University of Alabama. She has had the opportunity to work with clients in local schools, adult rehabilitation and nursing facilities.

She is currently and intern at Metro Music Therapy in Atlanta, GA. Her principal instrument is voice . While she is also proficient in piano and guitar, she enjoys songwriting also. When she is not working with clients, she enjoys cooking and reading. Bianca is thrilled to be on the Metro Music Therapy team.

2017-01-05T17:22:03+00:00January 5th, 2017|Uncategorized|

MMT & Northside Hospital

maternityMetro Music Therapy is thrilled to announce the details of their newest project that is being completed with the H.E.A.R.T. strings Perinatal Bereavement and Palliative Care office at Northside Hospital.

The MMT team and H.E.A.R.T. strings have been working for months to write original scripts and original music for a Relaxation CD for parents who have lost or are anticipating the loss of their baby.

The CD will be finished in the Fall of 2016 and once completed, will be available for public purchase. Proceeds will benefit H.E.A.R.T. strings patients at Northside Hospital.

You can learn more about the bereavement services Metro Music Therapy offers here. Click here to learn more about the H.E.A.R.T. strings Perinatal Bereavement and Palliative Care program.

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Music Therapy and iPods

gratitudeA few weeks ago, Sam and I had the honor of traveling to St. Simons Island to attend the Georgia Health Care Association’s Annual Social Worker’s Meeting. We were invited to this conference to view the film, Alive Inside, with the conference attendees, and we presented immediately after about the benefits of music therapy for patients and residents in long-term residential care. I want to tell you what we observed, learned, and have taken away from this experience!

First and Foremost, let’s address the elephant in the room: Why do Music Therapists get so fired up about the film, “Alive Inside,” and the hype surrounding it? If you are a music therapist, you know what I mean. If you are not a music therapist, you might be confused as to why our field is a little on edge about this film. I think our collective defensiveness is based off of this simple idea: the common public perception is that the Music & Memory program IS Music Therapy. Many friends and family members have been thrilled to share the news of the film with us, saying, “This reminded me of you and of the work you do!” — and while that should be a compliment, we get defensive because our field is often misunderstood.

During our presentation, I told the room of social workers that as a musician, I was excited to see the seniors in the film receive access to their favorite music. As a music therapist, however, I saw missed opportunities to address clinical goals such as reducing isolation, increasing opportunities for socialization, memory recall, verbal processing, making emotional connections with family members, life review, and improving overall quality of life. This is why the iPod program is not a replacement for music therapy services.

One example of this “missed opportunity” involved Henry, the elderly gentleman with Alzheimer’s. The facility staff described him as being confused and isolated most of the time, a very typical description of any individual with dementia or Alzheimer’s. When the staff placed the headphones on Henry’s ears and began playing his favorite music, Henry became “alive” – he truly lit up. His affect became bright and his eyes flew wide open. He began singing (beautifully), and then recalled memories about the music he was hearing. So why would I call this a missed opportunity? If you watch the room while Henry is having this experience, you see other residents sitting around him, craning their necks with genuine interest to see what Henry is doing. You see Henry, a man who is typically isolated, becoming even more isolated while he closes out the world to listen to his music, completely by himself. I saw this moment as an opportunity to send in a board-certified music therapist to facilitate a group session which would incorporate everyone in the room in any capacity. Henry would then be able to share his memories and experiences with his peers – something that is nearly impossible for him to do when his memory is not livened by the music.

ipodSo, Music Therapists should be defensive then, right? I don’t believe so. This film shows us the positive power that music holds over our minds and memories. I wholeheartedly believe that every human should have access to their favorite music, and should be able to listen to it whenever they want. I also believe that Music Therapy is an effective clinical treatment option and – hear me – should not be implemented in a unit or facility all day every day. We work on clinical treatment goals and our patients and clients get exhausted. They need a mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual break. Just as a physical therapist shouldn’t be with a patient all day every day in order to let the body rest and restore before the next session, we can’t be with a patient 24/7. Music Therapists listen to me carefully: we cannot have it both ways. Let’s be very careful not to contradict ourselves. We can’t ask the world to view our services as something different than music entertainment (which it is!) and also get upset or offended when a facility brings someone or something in to act as entertainment. So we shouldn’t be defensive when a facility with whom we work brings in an iPod program, as long as that program isn’t meant to replace music therapy services (if it is, we need to better educate on the differences between the two, and the exclusive benefits of both).

This is why I believe every facility will benefit from having a music entertainment program (be it iPods, live musicians, etc) AND a music therapy program. People need to listen to music leisurely and for entertainment, and in a separate time and place, patients and clients with any diagnosis should have access to music therapy services to address their treatment goals. It shouldn’t be a choice between one or the other – it should be both.

Music Therapists, we have come a long way in the past 60-70 years. Think about how much further we can go if we were to view music entertainment programs as allies, and not enemies!

*Want to learn more about approaching and educating facilities on the differences between an iPod program and Music Therapy services? Attend the MMT Academy Spring 2016 course entitled, “Music Therapy & iPods” taking place in Atlanta and via live streaming on March 13, 2016! More info announced here on 11.12.15

Where will MMT be this Fall?

we love the fall

Check out what we are up to this Fall – join us when and where you can!
{If you need more information about any of the events below, just email us!}

SEPTEMBER 2015:

OCTOBER 2015:

NOVEMBER 2015:

DECEMBER 2015:

  • 12/12/15 – 10th Annual Jingle Jog for Autism and All Exceptionalities! {5K & 1 Mile Fun Run} @ Loganville High School
2016-12-03T04:33:12+00:00September 14th, 2015|Uncategorized|

Pre-Approved vs. Self-Directed CMTE Credits

got youThe Metro Music Therapy Academy exists to help music therapists earn affordable, relevant, live & in-person continuing education credits. We also want to make earning your CMTE credits as easy as possible.

One way we are doing this is by creating this document just for music therapists that outlines the difference between PRE-APPROVED CMTE courses and SELF-DIRECTED CMTE courses. Download the document here: CMTE Credits – The MMT Academy

And guess what? The Metro Music Therapy Academy promises that if we offer a non pre-approved event, we will make it as SIMPLE as possible for you to claim the CMTE credits for attending.

The Metro Music Therapy Academy was created BY Music Therapists FOR Music Therapists. Don’t fret, we’ve got you!

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2016-12-03T04:33:12+00:00September 9th, 2015|Uncategorized|

Music Therapy: Cost Savings

Can music therapy help your program save money?

cost savings

In short, YES. Music Therapy is a very cost-effective healthcare treatment. While more studies need to be done, here are our top four favorite studies that show how cost-effective music therapy is as a treatment:

  1. Walworth, D.D. (2005). Procedural-support music therapy in the healthcare setting: a cost effectiveness analysis. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 20(4), 276-84.
    1. MT had a 100% success rate of eliminating the need for sedation for pediatric patients receiving EEG; 80.7% success rate for pediatric CT scan without sedation; 94.1% success rate for all of the procedures
    2. The cost analysis resulted in the total per patient receiving music therapy being$13.21 and $87.45 for patients without music therapy = net savings of $74.24 (85%)
    3. The project resulted in saving 184 RN-hours for other duties
  2. Romo, R. & Gifford, L. (2007). A Cost-benefit analysis of music therapy in a home hospice. Nursing Economics, 25(6), 353-358.
    1. The total cost per patient in music therapy was $10,659 with $13,643 for a standard care patient, resulting in a cost savings of $2,984. The music therapy program cost $3,615, yielding a cost benefit ratio of 0.83. When using the cost per patient day, the cost benefit is 0.95
    2. 79% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the MT program increased their job satisfaction while 80% reported that knowing their company provided MT to its patients made their commitment to working with the company stronger
  3. Standley, J.& Walworth, D.D. (2005). Cost/Benefit Analysis of the Total Program, in J. Standley (Ed.), Medical Music Therapy, 33-40. AMTA.
    1. For the total expenditure in $57,600, the Florida State University affiliated music therapy/Arts in Medicine protocol in the Tallahassee Memorial Hospital reveal a total outlay for two partners of $17,247, or 70.1% of total savings
  4. Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, University of Georgia Hospital at Athens, University of North Carolina Medical Center, and Florida Hospital Orlando conducted a 5-year study (2001-2006) using the of PAL™ I (prototype) in their NICU Music Therapy Programs. Results yielded a 5-day reduction in the length of stay for NICU infants, which translates into a cost savings of $10,000 ($2,000 day)
2016-12-03T04:33:12+00:00July 12th, 2015|Music Therapy, Uncategorized|
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